FAQs
Frequently Asked Questions

Where are your practices located?

Western Ultrasound for Women is conveniently located in West Leederville and Murdoch. Click here for exact locations.

Is finding parking difficult near your practices?

At our West Leederville site, there is parking available on the streets (Cambridge St, McCourt St and Joseph St are the closest). Depending on the time of day it may be difficult to find parking and you may need to allow extra time to find parking.

At our Murdoch site, paid parking is available on the grounds of St John of God Hospital’s medical centre.  A small parking area for the Wexford Centre has now opened up on the East side of the Wexford building.  Note that parking has been difficult to find onsite, now that the hospital is getting increasingly busy.

Click here for maps.

Do I need to bring a referral?

Yes, this is a legal requirement, and we will ask you who your referring doctor is at time of booking. A clinical reason must be supplied on the referral. This is also required for you to obtain Medicare benefits.

Can I be bulk-billed?

Western Ultrasound for Women is a private provider of obstetric and gynecological imaging. This ensures that the highest level of service is provided, which is not possible at Medicare rebate levels.

Can I settle my account on another day?

We require payment in full on the day of your scan. Credit card and EFTPOS facilities are available.

Do you run on time?

Western Ultrasound for Women endeavours to run to schedule. However, there are times when we run behind time. This is usually because a) a baby has been in a difficult position to scan, b) a significant abnormality has been detected, which requires counselling/extra use of the specialists’ time, or c) a patient before you has been late.

You should try to arrive for your ultrasound at least 10 minutes before your scheduled appointment.  This will give you a chance to complete patient information forms at reception.

To avoid stress, you should allow up to 1 hour for your appointment.  This is usually adequate time for your ultrasound to be performed.  Most appointments do not take this length of time however delays are sometimes unavoidable.  It is important that we are able to take the time needed to ensure an accurate and thorough assessment occurs for all patients.  We appreciate your understanding in this matter.

First Trimester Screening (FTS) FAQ

1.  What is FTS?

FTS – First Trimester Screening.   It is a combined test using ultrasound, mother’s blood test and mother’s age to obtain a calculated risk for Trisomy 21 (Down syndrome), Trisomy 18 (Edward syndrome) and Trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome).  The ultrasound component can pick up a suspicion of other birth defects.

2.  How accurate is FTS?

The detection rate for basic FTS is 85 – 90%.  The false positive rate is about 5%.

3. When can I do this test?

The ultrasound in FTS can be done between 11 to 13 weeks and 6 days pregnancy.  The blood test can be performed earlier, from about 10 weeks of pregnancy.

4.  How much does the FTS ultrasound cost?

The FTS ultrasound cost is $285 ($59.50 Medicare rebate).

5.  How fast will the FTS result be available?

The results can be given to you on the day of the ultrasound scan, if blood test results are available.

6.  If the FTS result shows high risk, what should I do next?

If the test shows high risk, it is recommended that you consider undergoing invasive testing either by Chorionic Villus Sampling (CVS) or Amniocentesis because FTS is not diagnostic.  An alternative screening test is NIPT. The options will be discussed with you during your appointment, and recommendations will be made according to your level of risk.

7.  Can this test tell me if my baby will have other congenital malformations?

FTS involves an ultrasound scan of your pregnancy.  During this ultrasound, certain congenital malformations can be detected, however you will be given the option of a more detailed scan of fetal anatomy later in your pregnancy.

8.  Can the detailed ultrasound scan at 19 – 20 weeks of pregnancy detect Down syndrome?

The detailed ultrasound scan at 19 – 20 weeks of pregnancy is to look for any structural abnormality.  Some structural abnormalities point to an increased risk of Down syndrome and other birth defects.  An invasive test (CVS or amniocentesis) may be recommended to confirm the diagnosis of Down syndrome.

What if I am running late?

If you are running late, the practice would appreciate a phone call. We will attempt to reschedule you for later that day, but if that is not possible, you will have to be re-booked.

What should I expect from an ultrasound scan?

When our sonographer and sonologist are ready for you, we will invite you into our scanning room, ask you to lie down on a bed, and then to expose your abdomen. Warm gel will be placed on your skin, and then an ultrasound transducer will be gently placed on you. The transducer transmits information to the machine which will be translated into images on a screen, which you will be able to see. The sonologist will explain to you what you are seeing on the screen. After the scan, results will be conveyed to you, usually by the specialist if he or she is available.

Do I need a full bladder for the scan?

Some fluid in the bladder would be helpful to get optimal images. However, you do not need to be uncomfortably full or be “busting???. Going to the toilet an hour before the scan, then drinking a couple of glasses afterwards will usually mean that there is enough urine in the bladder for the scan.

Can you exclude Down Syndrome on ultrasound?

No. Whilst ultrasound appearances can sometimes be suggestive of Down Syndrome, only definitive tests such as Amniocentesis and Chorionic Villus Sampling will tell you for sure. Non-Invasive Pre-natal Testing, however, does have an accuracy of >99% and is close to being diagnostic. The First Trimester Screencan detect about 85% to 90% of fetuses with Down Syndrome.

Who can I bring to my obstetric ultrasound?

Pregnancy is an exciting time for couples, families and friends.  Your ultrasound is an opportunity to bond with your baby.  You are welcome to bring your partner or other support person to share in this special time.  Young children do not usually find ultrasound entertaining or exciting.  They can become distressed by being in a dark room.  If you bring a young child you should bring another adult so that if your child becomes upset or distracting, there is someone to take them outside if needed.  We aim to make your experience memorable and enjoyable, however it is important to remember that your ultrasound is a very important medical examination.  Your sonographer needs to concentrate and the presence of a disruptive child or many family members can sometimes be distracting.  Please keep this in mind when planning your visit.

Non-Invasive Pre-natal Testing FAQ

1.  What is Non-Invasive Pre-natal Testing?

Non Invasive Prenatal Testing.  It involves taking blood from the pregnant patient from 10 1/2 weeks pregnancy to test the pregnancy specifically for risks of Trisomy 21 (Down syndrome), Trisomy 18 (Edward syndrome) and Trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome).

2.  How accurate is the Non-Invasive Pre-natal Test?

The detection rate for the Non-Invasive Pre-natal Test is about 99%.  The false positive rate is about 0.5%.  There is about 2 to 5% risk of test failure.

3.   When can I do this test?

You can do this test from 10 1/2 weeks of pregnancy.

4.  How much is Non-Invasive Pre-natal Test?

The pricing of Harmony NIPT is $430. If the NIPT is done with an early scan (before 13 weeks) the price is $125 (for the scan) and $430 (for the bloods), totalling $555. If it is done with an early anatomy scan (from 13-15 weeks), the price will be $285 (for the scan) and $430 (for the blood), totalling $715. Pricing depends on the provider. Note that there is no Medicare rebate for the blood test.

5.  When will the Non-Invasive Pre-natal Test results be available?

The result for Non-Invasive Pre-natal Testing is usually available in about 7-10 days.

6.  If the Non-Invasive Pre-natal Test result is positive, what should I do next?

If the result is positive, it is recommended that you talk to your doctor about advice regarding invasive testing either by Chorionic Villus Sampling (CVS) or amniocentesis because Non-Invasive Pre-natal Testing is not diagnostic.

7.  Can this test tell me if my baby will have other congenital malformations?

No.  Non-Invasive Pre-natal Testing is specifically for Trisomy 21 (Down syndrome), Trisomy 18 (Edward syndrome) and Trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome) and sex chromosomal anomalies.  Unlike CVS or amniocentesis, it cannot tell you if there are any other types of chromosome or genetic anomalies.  It will not test for structural abnormalities.

Get a Free Consultancy

[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]